Army of the Potomac

Rochester, Vermont in the Civil War

Jul 28
thecivilwarparlor:

"In great deeds something abides. On great fields something stays. Forms change and pass; bodies disappear, but spirits linger, to consecrate ground for the vision-place of souls. And reverent men and women from afar, and generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to see where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field to ponder and dream; And lo! the shadow of a mighty presence shall wrap them in its bosom, and the power of the vision pass into their souls."
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain-
Speaking at the dedication of the Monument to the 20th Maine- October 3, 1889, Gettysburg, PA
http://www.brotherswar.com/Civil_War_Quotes_4e.htm

thecivilwarparlor:

"In great deeds something abides. On great fields something stays. Forms change and pass; bodies disappear, but spirits linger, to consecrate ground for the vision-place of souls. And reverent men and women from afar, and generations that know us not and that we know not of, heart-drawn to see where and by whom great things were suffered and done for them, shall come to this deathless field to ponder and dream; And lo! the shadow of a mighty presence shall wrap them in its bosom, and the power of the vision pass into their souls."

Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain-

Speaking at the dedication of the Monument to the 20th Maine- October 3, 1889, Gettysburg, PA

http://www.brotherswar.com/Civil_War_Quotes_4e.htm

(via buttons-beads-lace)


scienceofsarcasm:

Evening Post: August 12, 1899.
"She immediately alighted, caught hold of the astonished youth, and gave him a sound thrashing, using her fists in a scientific fashion…”

I would love to know what this means.

(via peashooter85)


miresalemcort:

John Henry Anderson. Spirit Rapping Exposed By Professor Anderson The Wizard Of The North, c.1855, London.

miresalemcort:

John Henry Anderson. Spirit Rapping Exposed By Professor Anderson The Wizard Of The North, c.1855, London.

(via littlepennydreadful)


Jul 27
retronauthq:

1830: Rates of Travel from New York
From the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, 1932. See this and more (between 1800-1930) at Retronaut.com

retronauthq:

1830: Rates of Travel from New York


From the Atlas of the Historical Geography of the United States, 1932. See this and more (between 1800-1930) at Retronaut.com

(via buttons-beads-lace)


oldbookillustrations:

Numerous furred animals.
Jules Férat, from The fur country, by Jules Verne, Boston, 1874.
(Source: archive.org)

oldbookillustrations:

Numerous furred animals.

Jules Férat, from The fur country, by Jules Verne, Boston, 1874.

(Source: archive.org)


Jul 25
thecivilwarparlor:

The Yankee Carpet Bagger
A magazine cartoon from 1872 expresses white Southern hostility to “carpetbagging” politicians from the North.   Bettmann/Corbis 
The term carpetbagger was a pejorative term referring to the carpet bags (a fashionable form of luggage at the time) which many of these newcomers carried. The term came to be associated with opportunism and exploitation by outsiders. The term is still used today to refer to an outsider perceived as using manipulation or fraud to obtain an objective.
Together with Republicans, carpetbaggers were said to have politically manipulated and controlled former Confederate states for varying periods for their own financial and power gains. In sum, carpetbaggers were seen as insidious Northern outsiders with questionable objectives meddling in local politics, buying up plantations at fire-sale prices and taking advantage of Southerners.
The term carpetbaggers was also used to describe the Republican political appointees who came South, arriving with their travel carpet bags. Southerners considered them ready to loot and plunder the defeated South

thecivilwarparlor:

The Yankee Carpet Bagger

A magazine cartoon from 1872 expresses white Southern hostility to “carpetbagging” politicians from the North.
Bettmann/Corbis

The term carpetbagger was a pejorative term referring to the carpet bags (a fashionable form of luggage at the time) which many of these newcomers carried. The term came to be associated with opportunism and exploitation by outsiders. The term is still used today to refer to an outsider perceived as using manipulation or fraud to obtain an objective.

Together with Republicans, carpetbaggers were said to have politically manipulated and controlled former Confederate states for varying periods for their own financial and power gains. In sum, carpetbaggers were seen as insidious Northern outsiders with questionable objectives meddling in local politics, buying up plantations at fire-sale prices and taking advantage of Southerners.

The term carpetbaggers was also used to describe the Republican political appointees who came South, arriving with their travel carpet bags. Southerners considered them ready to loot and plunder the defeated South


Jul 23
historicaltimes:

"Balloons starting to rise in balloon race", Berlin, 1908
Read More

historicaltimes:

"Balloons starting to rise in balloon race", Berlin, 1908

Read More

(via piratetreasure)


Jul 22

decimonono:

Tarjeta de las que repartían a las muchachas los jóvenes que disfrazados de monos salieron en la mascarada “El Entierro de la Sardina” en Murcia en el carnaval de 1878.

(vía Biblioteca Nacional)

(via superkintaro)


peashooter85:

Unidentified single shot percussion pistol/knuckleduster.  Has British proof markings, made sometime in the later half of the 19th century.

Estimated Value: $3,000 - $4,000



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